Thursday, 23 September 2010

Modern Science Map 2.0

I'm currently in the process of producing version 2.0 of the Modern Science Map.

The new version will allow you to hover the mouse over each scientist and reveal a summary panel of information on each scientist as well as being able to click to access the full details from Wikipedia.

I have now uploaded a prototype of version 2.0 here. The hover feature is currently only enabled for a limited number of scientists, mainly on the Physics line between Albert Einstein and James Clerk Maxwell.

Check it out, I was quite pleased with it so far.

Keep checking back, I should have them all down in a few weeks. There's not much on TV at the moment anyway.

10 comments:

Anonymous said...

Interesting, but the real issue IMO is the "pre-modern science". Copernicus got his idea that the earth goes around the sun from the Greek mathematician Aristarchus of Samos, who had already developed mathematical proofs some 1,500 years before Copernicus. The atomic theory, the idea of biological evolution, modern medicine, etc. all comes from Greek and Roman science, much of which was declared heretical by the Christians, and then rediscovered in the 14th-17th centuries.

Pedro Homero said...

It's great that you're working on this 2.0 version, but regarding that TV business... torrent sites are sharing HBO's new, fantastic series, Boardwalk Empire; wink, wink, nudge, nudge ;)

Neil Davies said...

Fantastic, that is excellent work!

Anonymous said...

very good work, but why did you put Perelman et forgot Jean-Pierre Serre, Mikhaïl Gromov and Alain Connes, who are far more important?

POds said...

Would it be interesting to have the entire worlds history in this sort of a map. That is, i can see it depicted in a network map of sorts. It could reveal fascinating facts, such like how massive leaps in human culture/society were propelled forward perhaps through various hubs of people etc.

Such a map might be easily constructed through an analysis of wikipedia perhaps with a few added special tags etc.

jaclong said...

Wow, the mouse-over stuff is really pretty cool, a very nice way to browse through.
No idea how much work you're putting into this but it looks like a heck of a lot. Great public service!

Can you make the T-shirts show more details too? So if someone is wearing it and you, say, poke them in the Schrodingers...

cheers ;)

Anonymous said...

Dear Sir,

you seem to forgot one of the greates scinetist Nikola Tesla, induction motor, rotatating magnetic field, systems for wirelesscommunication and his other invetions.....

Crispian Jago said...

Dear Sir,

Look harder......

Shandy said...

Love this, as does my teenaged nephew who loves science. Thank you for putting it together--what an effort.

In modern astronomy, I wonder if you wouldn't want to add Dr. Mike Brown during your revisions. His discoveries with regard to dwarf planets such as Eris led to the demotion of Pluto, the redefinition of our solar system and the emergence of a new class of celestial objects. He's currently at CalTech in Pasadena.

http://www.gps.caltech.edu/~mbrown/
http://www.gps.caltech.edu/~mbrown/planetlila/

Laneman said...

Sorry I did not see Watson or Crick in the genetics track. Did I miss them?

Would you consider adding an ecology/environmental science track?

This is a great graphic. It would make an awesome poster.